Promoting cultural diversity in the audiovisual industry in Canada and in Quebec: from dream to reality

TitlePromoting cultural diversity in the audiovisual industry in Canada and in Quebec: from dream to reality
Publication TypeConference Paper
Author(s)Théorêt, Y.
Affiliation (1st Author)Université du Québec
Section or WGPolitical Economy Section
DateFri 28 June
Slot CodePEF4a
Slot Code (Keyword)PEF4a
Time of Session16:00-17:30
RoomQG21
Session TitleCultural Diversity and Audiovisual Sector - Joint Session Media Education Research Section and Political Economy Section
Submission ID5314
Abstract

Promoting cultural diversity in the audiovisual industry in Canada and in Quebec: from dream to reality   Yves Théorêt, Ph.D.   Secretary General The Network of UNESCO Chairs in Communication (ORBICOM)   Professor School of Media Faculty of Communication University of Quebec in Montreal (UQAM)     Canada and Quebec are important promoters of cultural diversity[1]. Canada recognized the country’s multicultural character in its 1982 Constitution, and Quebec, a primarily francophone province, is a strong supporter of interculturalism[2].   Canadian multiculturalism and Quebecois interculturalism have become important facets of Canadian and Quebecois identities. For the Government of Canada, Canadian society is one of different cultural communities all equal before the law, whereas Quebec, to sustain its francophone minority in America, has adopted policies that aim to integrate cultural communities with the francophone majority while preserving the prominent features of these communities.   However, in Canada and in Quebec, little has been done when it comes to First Nations, Canada’s Native Peoples. In some cases, living conditions are miserable. Moreover, Canada waited until 2010 before adhering to the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.   The States party to UNESCO’s 2001 Declaration on Cultural Diversity and 2008 Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions have all recognized the importance of cultural diversity. Has this recognition been followed by concrete actions (legislation, regulations, programs, etc.) aimed at promoting cultural diversity in the audiovisual industry in Canada and in Quebec? More specifically, does Canadian and Quebecois public and private television promote cultural diversity and are Canada’s and Quebec’s different cultural communities represented on the small screen?   This presentation aims to identify the various policies and actions of the Governments of Canada and of Quebec when it comes to cultural diversity and to evaluate the impact these have had on public and private television programming (over-the-air, cable channels, satellite channels, etc.).   [1] The term « diversity » is understood here in the same terms as those used by UNESCO : “diversity is embodied in the uniqueness and plurality of the identities of the groups and societies making up humankind”. UNESCO, Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity, 2 November 2001, Article 1. [2] For more on this matter, see Gérald Bouchard, L’interculturalisme, Boréal, Montréal, 2012.

Theme by Danetsoft and Danang Probo Sayekti inspired by Maksimer